Objection to Christianity: Christians are Evil Hypocrites

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One of the most common objections to Christianity is that Christians are evil hypocrites, and I have to admit that especially if you include all people who say that they are Christians (even if they are not) that even by human standards they are right. One only has to look at the news and see what has been happening to some little boys in some churches that this objection does have some merit.  The Bible itself says that ALL PEOPLE fall short of the glory of God.  Romans 3:23  when they say that Christians are, or at least can be evil they are doing nothing more than confessing that at least part of Christianity is true.
It breaks my heart whenever I hear of Christians that have done things that are evil even by human standards, but no belief system should be judged by the random people who say that they follow it,  there are atheist like Joseph Stalin who was responsible for the deaths of a seemingly countless number of people and atheist who are basically good.  Buddhist that literally would not kill a fly, and Buddist who have committed murder. Pagans that are passivist, and Pagans who have committed human sacrifice.   All belief systems have one thing in common; they all are followed by fallible humans. We should not judge those belief systems by random followers of the belief system, we should judge them by the foundational beliefs of that system, and the people who follow that belief system the best. In the case of Christianity, that person is Jesus Christ. Who is so good, that many belief systems have tried to turn him into a follower of their belief system. He encouraged people to be kind even to their enemies.  Don’t judge Christianity by the so-called Christians who have committed beastly behavior, judge it by the behavior of Christ.

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Skeptical Challenge: How Do We Know the Content of Jesus and Pilate’s Tête-à-Tête?

Reflections

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Some people attempt to justify their unbelief of Christianity on the grounds that the Bible contains irreconcilable difficulties and contradictions. One important role Christians serve in an apologetics-evangelism context is to try to remove obstacles that people have to believing in the truth of Scripture and thus in the truth of historic Christianity.

I once heard an atheist ask how the Gospel writers could conceivably know the nature of the private conversation between Jesus and Pontius Pilate before his condemnation and crucifixion (e.g., John 18:28–40). After all, the apostles—the proposed authors of the four Gospels—were not privy to this confidential dialogue.

This is a reasonable question. So, how can the Christian respond? There are two explanations to this objection, one purely natural and the other supernatural (or theological), but the two are not mutually exclusive.

First, given the nature of the controversy in Jerusalem surrounding Jesus of Nazareth and…

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Benjamin Rush, Founding Father, Christian, Doctor and Educator

The Declaration of Independence

“In contemplating the political institutions of the United States, I lament that we waste so much time and money in punishing crimes and take so little pains to prevent them. We profess to be republicans, and yet we neglect the only means of establishing and perpetuating our republican form of government, that is the universal education of our youth in the principles of Christianity by the means of the Bible. For this divine book, above all others, favors that equality among mankind, that respect for just laws, and those sober and frugal virtues, which constitute the soul of republicanism.”

Benjamin Rush ,  signer of the Declaration of Independence , member of the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention, professor of medicine,  writer,  principal founder of Dickinson College, slavery abolitionist,  leader in education, and an active Christian

“Christians Are Opposed To Science!” What Do You Mean By That?

In any debate or argument, it’s very important that you understand the terminology that your opponent is using and that your opponent understands the terminology that you’re using. If you don’t define your terms, you’ll just end up talking past each other and you’ll end up attacking straw men. As the philosopher, Voltaire put it: “Define your terms or we shall be like two ships passing in the night.”[1]Often, you’ll hear atheists and anti-theists say things like “Christians don’t believe in science” or “Christians are anti-science!” or “You can believe in God or you can believe in science, but not both.” or “You can believe in The Bible or you can believe in science, but not both.” Atheists claim to be the champions of science and they deride Christians and Christianity for being opponents to science. But, in order to respond to the secularist’s claims, one has to ask a very important question: “What do you mean by that?” It’s one of the questions of The Colombo Tactic, a debate tactic talked about in Greg Koukl’s Tactics: A Game Plan For Discussing Your Christian Convictions.

Read more at: “Christians Are Opposed To Science!” What Do You Mean By That?

A Note to My Virtuous Friends

Mitch Teemley

“To do good is noble, but to teach others to do good is nobler…and much less trouble.” ~Mark Twain

8a8d21f5d0288aee5008a8630f086eda_400x400Many of us who are writers andteachers hope, I suspect, to affirm our own nobility by telling others how to behave.* Yet most of us are at least part-time purveyors of the sins we condemn, and spotty practitioners of the virtues we extol.

A. A. Milne, creator of Winnie the Pooh and real life daddy of Christopher Robin, was reportedly a cold and distant father. Beloved Victorian moralist Charles Dickens summarily dumped his wife of twenty years for a 17 year old actress.

Are we trying to get into heaven by riding the coattails of those we shove?

The Apostle Paul admonishes us to “be a model” to those we teach, “both in word and in deed, in love, faith, and purity.” “Live there,” he says, “be that person…so that…

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