Question for my readers about evil examples

Whenever I discuss the problem of Evil, or relativism I use examples of evil, and workers of evil like torturing babies for fun, and Hitler, I use such extremes because in a day and age that mass murders like Che Guevara are worshiped, and when people talk about killing unborn babies in a way that allows them to harvest organs, while eating lunch,  it is becoming more and more difficult to find examples of evil that both me, and the audience will recognize as evil.

On a few occasions I have had people accuse me of calling them like Hitler, or saying that they torture babies for fun, which is not my intent, and I suspect is just a way to get me off track when they have no other response. Nevertheless, I would like any suggestions you have on phrasing when you need to give an example on evil that might help me avoid this discussion stopper.

Disrespecting respectability, dishonoring the honorable.

” they seem to share little beyond a stubborn immaturity wedded to a towering narcissism.”

Dalrock

In The Revenge of The Lost Boys* Tom Nichols begins with a familiar question:

What’s going on with young American men?

Nichols focuses primarily on examples of men that Vox Day categorizes as gammas:

Beyond this, they seem to share little beyond a stubborn immaturity wedded to a towering narcissism.

Stuck in perpetual adolescence, they see only their own imagined virtue amidst irredeemable corruption.

…the combination of immaturity and grandiosity among these young males is jaw-dropping in its scale even when it is not expressed through the barrel of a gun.

These young losers live through heroic fantasies and constructed identities rather than through work and human relationships.

…these man-boys are confused about their sexuality and frustrated by their own social awkwardness, and seek to compensate for it. They turn into what German writer Hans Enzensberger called “the radicalized losers,” the unsuccessful males who channel their…

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7 Behaviors Of Emotionally Wealthy People That You Should Emulate

I need to work on this list in my personal life.

 

 

“Weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character” – Albert Einstein

Being emotionally wealthy is an essential part of your success as it determines your attitude and thoughts towards life. People who are emotionally strong have a bigger potential to become successful than those who are emotionally weak.

How is that possible? Emotionally wealthy people possess qualities that other people don’t. When you are emotionally wealthy you have the power to handle your thoughts in the best way possible and other people have a tendency to be naturally drawn to you.

But are you emotionally wealthy? Check out these signs to find out.

If not, then start emulating these behaviors. Let’s see what distinguishes emotionally wealthy people from the rest:

via 7 Behaviors Of Emotionally Wealthy People That You Should Emulate.

Should Christians seek to help the poor by growing a secular government?

SHOULD CHRISTIANS SEEK TO HELP THE POOR BY GROWING A SECULAR GOVERNMENT?

WINTERY KNIGHT

I found a paper (PDF) on the University of Washington web site that makes the case for why Christians ought to care about more than just social issues when it comes to politics and elections.

Here’s the abstract:

What accounts for cross-national variation in religiosity as measured by church attendance and non-religious rates? Examining answers from both secularization theory and the religious economy perspective, we assert that cross-national variation in religious participation is a function of government welfare spending and provide a theory that links macro-sociological outcomes with individual rationality. Churches historically have provided social welfare. As governments gradually assume many of these welfare functions, individuals with elastic preferences for spiritual goods will reduce their level of participation since the desired welfare goods can be obtained from secular sources. Cross-national data on welfare spending and religious participation show a strong negative relationship between these two variables after controlling for other…

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